Today, with nearly half the world's population wired to the internet, the ever-increasing connectivity has created global shifts in strategic thinking and positioning, disrupting industry after industry, sector after sector. Seemingly, with each passing day, some new technological tool emerges that revolutionizes our lives, further deepening and embedding our dependence on the world wide web.
You wish you could segment and target both existing and potential customers, but don’t have the right data to do so. You’re going to need more than just a first and last name and email address to properly comb your way through the customer data. An automation tool provides you with data such as location information, job titles, and behavioral insights, and makes that data more actionable.
The best way to overcome the limitation of time is by automating some of your processes — and marketing is one area ripe for automation. The key for small businesses is finding a tool that can automate many components of marketing at once, and these seven platforms take different approaches to automating marketing processes to make entrepreneurs’ lives easier.
Quality content is more likely to get shared. By staying away from creating "thin" content and focusing more on content that cites sources, is lengthy and it reaches unique insights, you'll be able to gain Google's trust over time. Remember, this happens as a component of time. Google knows you can't just go out there and create massive amounts of content in a few days. If you try to spin content or duplicate it in any fashion, you'll suffer a Google penalty and your visibility will be stifled.

Using simple yes-and-no questions, Active Campaign funnels your contacts into groups based on the actions they've taken—like emails they've opened, pages they've visited, whether or not they've subscribed to your blog newsletter—and sends drip emails accordingly. It's one of the simplest ways to make a detailed drip email campaign that still fits with your normal email newsletters.
As every small business owner knows, wearing a lot of hats is how you keep your company in the black. The problem, of course, is that any business owner only has 24 hours in a day. Cramming business development, customer service, marketing, production, financials, and everything else on one to-do list is a recipe for disaster (and a complete lack of sleep).

However, don’t get me wrong. If Google simply found your website a few years back and you did nothing with it since then, it won’t help you much. Indexed age is also rolled into what happened during that period between the first indexing and now. This relates to things like link velocity and content curation over time. It’s highly complex and involved.


Infusionsoft has found that its automation platform saves users about 28 hours per month when it’s integrated with users’ other systems. That platform automates lead capture and follow-ups based on user activity and collects data about customers to enable personalization. Its analytics reports shine a light on what’s working, what’s not, and what the current ROI is for any campaign.

You should space your drip emails out to avoid overwhelming your contacts—who wants a dozen emails the first day they sign up for a new app? You could just set up a simple schedule where emails go out every 3rd day, or you could be even smarter about your timeline—Customer.io monitors your site in real-time, then sends precisely timed drip emails for the best results.
Your customers, prospects, and partners are the lifeblood of of your business. You need to build your marketing strategy around them. Step 1 of marketing is understanding what your customers want, which can be challenging when you’re dealing with such a diverse audience. This chapter will walk you through (1) the process of building personal connections at scale and (2) crafting customer value propositions that funnel back to ROI for your company.
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